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To make FARTS of Portingale?

Talk about period recipes & ingredients

To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby Captain Reech » Thu May 26, 2011 4:24 pm

Please tell me someone has tried this, the name alone has got to be worth it!

To make Farts of Portingale.
Take a quart of life Hony, and set it upon the fire and when it seetheth scum it clean, and then put in a certaine of fine Biskets well serced, and some pouder of Cloves, some Ginger, and powder of sinamon, Annis seeds and some Sugar, and let all these be well stirred upon the fire, til it be as thicke as you thinke needfull, and for the paste for them take Flower as finelye dressed as may be, and a good peece of sweet Butter, and woorke all these same well togither, and not knead it.

Now, I'm OK with heating the honey and skimming off any scum but I'm puzzled with the "Biskets well serced" Would this be a sweet biscuit broken and sieved? I may be completely on the wrong track but I'm looking at something to thicken the honey and spice mixture......Aha...a paste for it, the mist clears, it looks like that should be in a pastry case so maybe it's TARTS I'm looking at? (How very disappointing!) Have I just discovered something like a Tudor 'Gypsy Tart'?

(Or am I utterly delusional?)
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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby TerryL » Thu May 26, 2011 4:28 pm

Hmm, have you just discovered a typo? (and of what age)
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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby TerryL » Thu May 26, 2011 4:32 pm

Hmmm some more, a google shows up this

http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/ghhk/ ... _notes.htm

with 2 (partial) recipes, neither of which matches your recipe but seem to be spicy mutton balls
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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby Elise_Fleming » Thu May 26, 2011 6:08 pm

"Farts" is indeed the name, according to Ken Albala ("Cooking in Europe: 1250-1650"). He quotes the recipe on p. 131 and writes, "Although the typesetter seems to have made a few mistakes here (as in a certain of what fine Biskets), the name of these cookies is indeed Farts of Portugal...It may seem redundant to make cookies out of crushed and sieved biscuits, but the intention is to make something light and crumbly. They should be baked."

Smacks rather of making a groom's cake out of the cookies that Prince William so loves, or crumbling up graham crackers for a pie crust, doesn't it?

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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby Captain Reech » Fri May 27, 2011 9:57 am

Thanks for that guys. I think I'm going to have a go at these, anyone got a suggestion for a biscuit to use? I'm assuming something fairly plain, perhaps shortbread?

I'll have a look at the one you found Terry, spicy mutton balls sounds tasty!
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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby Captain Reech » Fri May 27, 2011 10:12 am

Ooooh they do sound nice, looks like the meat dish should be 'Fists' of Portugal (which makes sense for a small ball of meat that would fit in your hand) I'm going to give it a go with breast of lamb (it's dirt cheap and I find fatty cuts of meat stick together better when making meat balls or burgers) Looks like a tasty dish that could be achieved at an event without too much trouble.
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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby Elise_Fleming » Fri May 27, 2011 11:22 am

Captain Reech wrote:Thanks for that guys. I think I'm going to have a go at these, anyone got a suggestion for a biscuit to use? I'm assuming something fairly plain, perhaps shortbread?


At the risk of being fussy, I'd say no to shortbread. It's not a "bis-cuit", that is it's not cooked twice (bis=repeat; cuit=cook). Albala lists his recipe from "A.W., A book of cokrye very necessary for all such as delight therin." I'm not sure I have that particular book, but I have several from surrounding years. Dawson (1596, "The Good Huswifes Jewell", has a recipe called "To make Bisket bread".

Now... I must stop here and say what I did just before I started typing in the long recipe. I looked up "bisket bread" - that spelling - and found a woman's web page where she has already printed the recipe, what she did with it and - Ta dah!!! - a half-dozen or more contemporary recipes, plus a chart which compares the ingredients of each of those with the other! Rather than typing in Dawson's recipe, as I intended, I will send you to her page: http://tinyurl.com/3k39tk2 . I made one of the shorter versions once and it turned out well. The texture reminded me of what US mothers used to use as teething biscuits for babies. Italian biscotti (bis-cotti=twice cooked/baked) is a similar texture.

So, no to shortbread. Great cookie/biscuit. Wrong texture. Have fun! :-)

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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby Captain Reech » Fri May 27, 2011 12:09 pm

Brilliant stuff Elise, thank you very much, I shall hang onto the biscuit recipe for later and try the experiment with biscotti, I don't fancy going to all the effort of making the bisket bread, smshing it up and sifting it if the trial batch isn't at least a partial success. If it works I'll try going totally authentic.
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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby JeffBerry » Sat May 28, 2011 5:30 pm

Captain Reech wrote:Brilliant stuff Elise, thank you very much, I shall hang onto the biscuit recipe for later and try the experiment with biscotti, I don't fancy going to all the effort of making the bisket bread, smshing it up and sifting it if the trial batch isn't at least a partial success. If it works I'll try going totally authentic.


Biscotti is usually my relatively cheap and easy medieval "biscuit" substitute. I recently did a run at Taillevant's "Tailliz for Lent" using biscotti and it turned out pretty well.

JB

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Re: To make FARTS of Portingale?

Postby Ceara » Fri Jun 17, 2011 9:48 pm

Elise_Fleming wrote:So, no to shortbread. Great cookie/biscuit. Wrong texture. Have fun! :-)


I just discovered this thread and my interest has been stirred in it. I agree with Elise on the shortbread, either biscotti or for a modern biscuit, perhaps digestive biscuits. They defiantly sound interesting and I too, think I shall try them.

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