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A Georgian pea soup

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A Georgian pea soup

Postby tudorcook » Tue Sep 21, 2010 10:19 pm

A green peas soop.

TAKE a quart of old green peas, and boil them till they are quite tender as pap, in a quart of water, then strain them through a sieve, and boil a quart of young peas in that water. In the mean time put the old peas into a sieve, pour half a pound of melted butter over them, and strain them through the sieve with the back of a spoon, till you have got all the pulp. When the young peas are boiled enough, add the pulp and butter to the young peas and liquor; stir them together till they are smooth, and season with pepper and salt. You may fry a French roll, and let it swim in the dish. If you like it, boil a bundle of mint in the peas.


Charles Carter.
The London and Country Cook 1749

Gorgeous...but then it does contain a pound of butter!
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Re: A Georgian pea soup

Postby TerryL » Tue Sep 21, 2010 10:53 pm

tudorcook wrote:A green peas soop.

...

Gorgeous...but then it does contain a pound of butter!



It's funny how many recipes seem to contain a bucket of butter... It's a good job they didn't know about cholesterol or they'd have given themselves blood pressure and heart attacks worrying about it.
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Re: A Georgian pea soup

Postby tudorcook » Tue Sep 21, 2010 11:19 pm

butter....the recipe cure all :mrgreen:
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Re: A Georgian pea soup

Postby digger » Wed Sep 22, 2010 12:37 am

What are the three secrets of French cuisine?

ɹǝʇʇnq puɐ ɹǝʇʇnq 'ɹǝʇʇnq

Sorry had to do that it immediately came into may head reading this post. ANd it is not so far fetched because french cuisine had a great influence an european cookery in those times.
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Re: A Georgian pea soup

Postby Elise_Fleming » Wed Sep 22, 2010 2:31 am

So, do you interpret old peas as dried peas?
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Re: A Georgian pea soup

Postby tudorcook » Wed Sep 22, 2010 12:54 pm

Elise_Fleming wrote:So, do you interpret old peas as dried peas?


you could, but we haven't!

Not sure about pea availability in the US, but over here in general we are pretty much limited to various varieties of dried (not popular), tinned processed (not natural :twisted: ) and frozen (very common)
Of the frozen, you can really only get 'garden peas' or 'petit pois' with the latter being young, small, sweet peas, the former being slightly larger, less sweet and now much less popular. We use those as the old peas and petit pois as the young as getting fresh peas in quantity proves to be a real problem for the cookery events.

I cooked this recipe as the starter for Xmas dinner last year and even my non-veg eating father ate it without complaining, so it must be good (or he was on best behaviour :-) )

I think using dried peas would work, but the texture of the finished dish wouldn't be the same, probably less smooth and more like a traditional 'winter warmer' soup...which would work but would change how the dish is perceived I think, if that makes sense.

Again though, in the grand scheme of things it's not that important, so long as the finished dish tastes good!
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