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Vegetable Recipe(s)

Talk about period recipes & ingredients

Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby Elise_Fleming » Tue Sep 21, 2010 1:20 pm

Do you have a good vegetable recipe that you would recommend serving with the "chekins in laek paest"?
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby TerryL » Tue Sep 21, 2010 1:58 pm

Robin did a "mushy peas" type dish, (not actual as we know it today mushy peas) at the last even and (shhh, it tasted quite good and I wouldn't mind having it with chicken of any sort, in or out of paste) but I don't know what that was called officially, but someone around here must. It seemed to have a hint of vinegar with it I think.

If they have any dishes with swedes (not white turnips, I hate those, they give me wind) or parsnips, those should do as well, (they must have some surely, even if veg doesn't feature in a major way in the books).
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby Grymm » Tue Sep 21, 2010 3:30 pm

Fenkel in Soppes

Take blades of fenkel; shrede hem not to smale. Do hem to seeth in water & oile, & oynouns mynced therewith. Do Þereto safroun & salt & powdour douce. Serve it forth. Take brede ytosted & lay the sewe onoward.

You could leave out the sops
Futuaris nisi irrisus ridebis.
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby Elise_Fleming » Tue Sep 21, 2010 5:49 pm

TerryL wrote:Robin did a "mushy peas" type dish, (not actual as we know it today mushy peas) at the last even and (shhh, it tasted quite good and I wouldn't mind having it with chicken of any sort, in or out of paste) but I don't know what that was called officially, but someone around here must. It seemed to have a hint of vinegar with it I think.


I think I might have found the recipe you mentioned - "perre" - which uses peas, onions, parsley with cinnamon/canell, pepper, vinegar, ginger. Robin (or anyone...), would the peas have to be cooked until they are "broken" as the recipe states, or given modern (US) tastes, could they be "whole"? (I tried mushy peas... once... with fish and chips in Newcastle. I think that has sufficed for my lifetime. That leaves more mushy peas for you all!)
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby TerryL » Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:02 pm

I think Robin cooked them until "they were done" and then pushed them through a sieve/collander thing to separate as much of the shells as possible.

Modern "mushy peas" are OK, I like them well enough but what Robin did was much better, the active ingredients (the vinegar particularly for me) added just that sharp edge. I looked for recipes on-line for modern mushy peas and see why they are a bit anemic, even Heston Blumenwotsits...

Mushy peas

Serves 4-6

475g frozen peas (I like Birds Eye)
65g butter
6 mint leaves
Salt and pepper, to taste

1 Defrost the frozen peas in a large pot filled with cool water — this should take a only few minutes. Strain, shaking off as much excess water as possible.

2 Reserve about one-fifth of the peas.Place the remaining peas into a sauté pan, along with the butter and 50ml water. Cook over a medium heat until all the water has evaporated and the peas are cooked through. If your water is very hard, it would be best to buy some bottled water (or, even better, de-ionized car-battery water) to use when cooking the peas, as this will help to keep their colour bright green.

3 Place the cooked peas into a blender (or use a stick blender) and purée. While blending, adjust the taste by adding the mint leaves and the salt and pepper.

4 Fold in the reserved peas and serve.


I borrowed that from , but quite frankly, forget it, try the perre or whatever it was, but 'a la dente' is undercooked in my view, the peas need to cooked, but not cooked until dead.
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby tudorcook » Tue Sep 21, 2010 9:52 pm

Elise_Fleming wrote:I think I might have found the recipe you mentioned - "perre" - which uses peas, onions, parsley with cinnamon/canell, pepper, vinegar, ginger. Robin (or anyone...), would the peas have to be cooked until they are "broken" as the recipe states, or given modern (US) tastes, could they be "whole"? (I tried mushy peas... once... with fish and chips in Newcastle. I think that has sufficed for my lifetime. That leaves more mushy peas for you all!)


yep, that's the one he's on about.

It really does need the peas to be processed in some way otherwise it's just a flavoured pea and onion dish isn't it?

We've tried it with frozen garden peas, frozen petite pois, dried green, and yellow peas and they all work well, just needing differing degrees of cooking and subsequent processing.
The passing through the strainer is simply to remove the tougher outer skin on the pea, something that is much less of a problem with our modern varieties of peas, although if using the dried peas it really helps the end result. You could blitz the lot in a food processor (Cuisinart or the like) to save time and because the skins aren't that tough it would give a similar end result....and after all, in a real life context, it's what it tastes and 'eats' like that is the important thing surely.....I wouldn't process it too much anyway as you'll end up with soup then, not the point of the exercise! (Georgian green pea soup is another matter...maybe I'll find that out and post it up, really worth a try). The other alternative which is so much easier is to use dried peas and cook them until they burst but don't bother passing them through the sieve...it won't make a vast difference to the end result..this doesn't work so well with frozen peas we've found as they simply refuse to burst just with simple boiling, but that's to be expected as that's not what the modern consumer wants when cooking their peas.

From a personal perspective, mincing the onions finely and adding them only for around the last half an hour or so at most....removing the raw onion bite, but still leaving a little crunch to them....gives the nicest results...but your tastes may differ.
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby Elise_Fleming » Wed Sep 22, 2010 2:35 am

Thanks! Since this is to be part of a birthday dinner, I suppose I should try the recipe before inflic... er... serving it to the guest of honor. I've got a "ricer" which might work well to mash the peas and leave the outer coating. My problem is that there is no one else in the house to eat anything that I prepare. I'm not too sure I can finish off a package of peas - unless it tastes really good. (I could always add butter, I suppose!)
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby tudorcook » Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:39 am

hmm a ricer should work quite well I'd have thought....I have to say that of all the vegetable recipes we ever do, this one is always one of the most popular and is nearly always all eaten...left overs can always be frozen or fried if you make it dry enough...and as you say, there's always butter :lols:
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby TerryL » Wed Sep 22, 2010 8:43 am

tudorcook wrote:hmm a ricer should work quite well I'd have thought....I have to say that of all the vegetable recipes we ever do, this one is always one of the most popular and is nearly always all eaten...left overs can always be frozen or fried if you make it dry enough...and as you say, there's always butter :lols:


Ohh yeah, leftover perre, mixed with some lightly mashed leftover roast or boiled potatoes, maybe cabbage (chopped small if in big bits) or brusel sprouts (do Brusel sprouts get a B or a b, and does is have anything to do with Brusels?), fried in a little butter as a bubble and squeak, great breaksat with some black pudding and a couple of eggs, (bacon to taste).
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Re: Vegetable Recipe(s)

Postby tudorcook » Wed Sep 22, 2010 12:43 pm

hmmm.....bubble :drool: :drool:

but as an aside....here's the OED definition for Brussels Terry (useful bit in blue):

Brussels
SECOND EDITION 1989

[Name of the capital of Belgium, used attrib. to designate things connected, in their origin or manufacture, with that city.]

1. Short for ‘Brussels carpet’.
1813 D. WORDSWORTH Let. in M. Moorman W. Wordsworth (1965) II. vii. 230 We are going to have a Turkey!!! carpet in the dining-room, and a Brussels in William's study. a1845 HOOD Domestic Asides iii, What boots for my new Brussels! 1882 W. D. HOWELLS Woman's Reason viii, The reception-room..was respectable in threadbare brussels.

2. attrib. or Comb., as Brussels carpet, a kind of carpet having a back of stout linen thread and an upper surface of wool (see quot. 1875); Brussels lace, a costly kind of pillow-lace made in Brussels and its neighbourhood, noted for the thickness and evenness of its texture, and the delicate accuracy of its forms: Brussels sprout (almost always pl.), the bud-bearing Cabbage (Brassica oleracea gemmifera), a variety producing buds like small cabbages in the axils of its leaves.

1799 Times 1 June 4/2 *Brussels and Wilton carpets. 1831 CARLYLE Sart. Res. I. iv, A whole immensity of Brussels carpet, and pier-glasses. 1875 URE Dict. Arts I. 732 In the Brussels carpets the worsted yarn raised to form the pile..is not cut. In the imperial Brussels the figure is raised above the ground, and its pile is cut, but the ground is uncut.
1748 RICHARDSON Clarissa iii. III. 28 Her head dress was a *Brussels lace mob. 1823 BYRON Juan XIV, xlvii, Sympathy..robes sweet friendship in a Brussels lace. 1796 C. MARSHALL Garden. xv. (1813) 224 *Brussels sprouts are winter greens growing much like boorcole. 1861 DELAMER Kitch. Gard. 57 And from the bud at the root of the foot~stalk of each, will appear a miniature cabbage, which is the Brussels sprout.
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